Most people tend to repeat the same behaviors over time – humans are creatures of habit, and this translates to what we spend money on. In fact, most families in America buy the same 150 products, time and time again, year round. People are brand conscious, they find something they like and stick with it. This may seem like bad news if you’re trying to introduce new products or services to the public, but don’t get discouraged too quickly. Below are some tips on helping your prospective customers overcome their initial hesitation about trying something new.
1. Play up the perks. Why is your product superior to the competition? This is what you should get across from the get-go. What makes your product more effective, convenient, prestigous? Why is it a better value?

2. Fit into your customer’s existing groove. If people perceive that it will be a hassle to switch from an existing product or service to the one you’re selling, they’ll be hesitant to even try it. Ensure your potential clientele knows how easy it will be to make the switch. Additionally, emphasize the advantages of your product over the competition.

3. It just has to work. Your product should function as advertised with little or no set up. If your product isn’t easy to use, your audience won’t be interested for long. Furthermore, it needs to work the same way the first time they use it, and the hundredth time they use it – people appreciate consistency.

4. Highlight your advantages. What makes your product appealing? Make sure that the packaging of your product allows you to market it’s perceived advantages. Nobody is going to purchase a great product if it’s hidden behind lousy packaging.

5. Give out free samples or trials. People love a good “try before you buy” scenario. Whether it’s a free month long trial for software, or an in-store demo of a physical good, people will appreciate that you’re willing to let them sample your product risk-free. If you can’t afford to give your product away, give a discount to new customers. Capturing an audience of repeat buyers will pay off in the long run.

 

Source: Entrepreneur.com